Invasion by Roxanne Bland

Rating: ★★★

RCR Says: “Early in the story, it becomes apparent that the characters’ relationships are complicated—as described in the plot summary above—which lends a beautiful tension throughout most of the storyline.”

Snow City by G. A. Kathryns

Rating: ★★★★

RCR Says: “While certain questions go unanswered, ‘Snow City’ is weighty enough to stand on its own, and it illuminates human themes like family and mortality with unusual delicacy and compassion.”

The Effigy by James West

Rating: ★★★★

RCR Says: “This might seem like something one would normally say just for the effect, but ‘The Effigy’ is a book that must be read to be truly experienced.”

 

Recently Reviewed

Diary of a Witch’s Son by Oksana Leslie

★★★★  Diary of a Witch’s Son by Oksana Leslie follows an immigrant family’s harrowing experiences with their unfriendly and oftentimes dangerous neighbors. Told through the perspective of the author’s young son, this is a work of thrilling, narrative nonfiction that details the trauma and heartache the family faces at the hands of Mrs. Burton, their jealous neighbor who is bent on destroying the family and having their matriarch arrested. Max Bush, the young son, writes in diary form of how Mrs. Burton makes untrue claims about his family to the police, though they have a difficult time proving the claims to be false. Finally, after a sequence of dramatic turns, the Bush family is able to prove their innocence and continue on with their lives and livelihood. Overall, this is an inspiring story about a hard-working immigrant family finding personal success and financial security through honesty, long hours, strong family bonds, and pure determination. 

Read the full review by clicking on the book’s cover or title!

Recently Reviewed

 

Kindness in a Scary World, written by Rebecca J. Hubbard & illustrated by Becca Johnson

★★★★★  Kindness in a Scary World, written by Rebecca J. Hubbard and illustrated by Becca Johnson, is a children’s book that serves as a conversation starter with kids about tragic events like terrorist attacks and mass shootings. The story follows a child who observes his parents’ reaction to live news footage of a shooting, and witnesses some of that footage himself. This draws parents and child into a discussion about the causes and effects of tragedies such as the one they watched play out on the television that very evening, and whether there is anything the family can do to help make the situation better. Ultimately, the child’s parents tell him, many of us are only able to contribute in small ways, like sending money or thoughtful letters. But even these small instances of kindness can add up to make large differences in the lives of people affected by tragedy.

Read the full review by clicking on the book’s cover or title!