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We Have Your Son by Bridget McGowan

rsz_four-stars

She’s a bit of a tomboy and perhaps, some would say, a loner. She comes from a working class family with strong, working class values, and she couldn’t care less about the name on the label that’s attached to her jeans or sneakers. No doubt about it, Emma McGregor doesn’t really fit in at her haughty prep school, and just when she thinks things can’t get any worse, they actually start to get better. When a handsome hunk walks into her homeroom on the first day of junior year, Emma finds a new, real friend… and a lifeline. Suddenly, her life takes on new shape and becomes fuller, and she gains more friends, and more self-confidence, in the process. But Emma is a bright, stellar student, and even though math might not be her best subject, she soon discovers that things simply aren’t adding up as far as her new friend—and potential boyfriend—is concerned. Jeremy Myles definitely has more than a mere air of intrigue about him, and Emma can’t help but be curious about the gaps and inconsistencies in his stories, not to mention his sometimes strange behavior, extreme secrecy, and occasional unexplained sicknesses or bruises.

We Have Your Son by Bridget McGowan is a very ambitious mixed genre novel that calls together a teenage love story and a suspense thriller. The majority of the book follows the growth of Emma and Jeremy’s relationship and raises red flags that pock the backdrop of Jeremy’s back story. With a title like We Have Your Son, it’s no surprise that that back story involves some elements of kidnapping/abduction, but exactly *what* elements it involves is indeed a surprise, and readers are sure to be shocked by what they discover. That said however, this book does leave a little something to be desired. It tells a great teenage love story, and it tells a great suspense thriller—but all told, it doesn’t necessarily tell them together. What should be two elements of one, interwoven story are presented more as two separate stories with just barely enough overlap to cloak them under the same title.